Elbow

Normal Anatomy of the Elbow

How does the Elbow joint work?

Find out more in this web based movie

Conditions

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel release surgery is a surgery to correct the cubital tunnel syndrome. Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment, is a condition caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow known as cubital tunnel. The ulnar nerve travels down the back of the elbow behind a bony bump called medial epicondyle and through a passageway called cubital tunnel.

For more information about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome, click on below tabs.

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a common name for the elbow condition lateral epicondylitis. It is an overuse injury that causes inflammation of the tendons that attach to the bony prominence outside the elbow. It is a painful condition resulting from repeated muscle contractions in the forearm that leads to inflammation and microtears in the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle. The lateral epicondyle is a bony prominence that is felt on the outside of the elbow and the condition is more common in sports individuals playing tennis.

For more information about Tennis Elbow, click on below tabs.

Elbow Fractures

Elbow Fracture occurs from a break in one or more of the bones of the elbow joint. Three bones—humerus, radius, and ulna—make up the elbow joint. The bones are held together by ligaments thus providing stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons around the bones coordinate the movements and help in performing various activities.

For more information about Elbow Fractures, click on below tabs.

Elbow Dislocation

The elbow is a hinge joint made up of 3 bones – humerus, radius and ulna. The bones are held together by ligaments to provide stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons move the bones around each other and help in performing various activities. Elbow dislocation occurs when the bones that make up the joint are forced out of alignment.

For more information about Elbow Dislocation, click on below tab.

Bicipital Tendonitis

Bicipital tendonitis is the inflammation of the biceps tendon, the tissue that connects muscle to bone in your upper arm, causing pain in the upper arm and shoulder. It is more common in men in the age group of 40 to 60 years and occurs during many sports activities like tennis, baseball, weightlifting and kayaking where overhead movement is involved.

For more information about Bicipital Tendonitis, click on below tab.

Elbow Sprains

Elbow Sprains are a common injury that occurs from over stretching or tearing the ligaments that support the elbow.

For more information about Elbow Sprains, click on below tabs.

Golfer’s Elbow

Golfer’s elbow, also called Medial Epicondylitis, is a painful condition occurring from repeated muscle contractions in the forearm that leads to inflammation and microtears in the tendons that attach to the medial epicondyle. The medial epicondyle is the bony prominence that is felt on the inside of the elbow.

For more information about Golfer’s Elbow, click on below tabs.

Brachial Plexus Injury

Brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originates at the spinal cord near the neck and passes down your upper arm from under your collar bone.

For more information about Brachial Plexus Injury, click on below tab.

Stiff Elbow

Elbow contracture refers to a stiff elbow with limited range of motion. It is a common complication following elbow surgery, fractures, dislocations, and burns.

For more information about Stiff Elbow, click on below tab.

Elbow Pain

The elbow is a hinge joint made up of 3 bones – humerus, radius and ulna. The bones are held together by ligaments to provide stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons move the bones around each other and help in performing various activities. The common causes of elbow pain include:

For more information about Elbow Pain, click on below tab.

Procedures

Biceps Tendon Repair

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Biceps tear can be complete or partial. Partial biceps tendon tears will not completely break the tendon. But, complete tendon tears will break the tendon into two parts.

For more information about Bicep Ruptures, click on below tabs.

Total Elbow Replacement

Elbows, although are not the weight-bearing joints, they are considered to be most important for functioning of upper limbs and even a minor trauma or disease condition affecting elbow may be painful and limit the movements of upper limbs.

For more information about Total Elbow Replacement, click on below tabs.

Tennis Elbow Surgery

Coming soon

Elbow Dislocation Treatment

Coming soon

Interactive web based movies (click on the desired topic to find out more)

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

thunder flex

Dr. Newcomer is currently the
team physician and medical
director for the Thunder Hockey
team and a team physician for
the Cornbelters Baseball team.

  • Patient Resources
© Dr. Joseph K. Newcomer, MD Normal Il 61761 United States

X

Tell a Friend

captcha